Author Topic: this page / this spread  (Read 3643 times)

Boris

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this page / this spread
« on: January 04, 2013, 04:37:22 PM »
The ability to just use the ref, e.g. (-> fig. 1) when it's on the same spread, but (-> fig. 1, page 4) when it's on another spread. Today I cannot find a solution to it.

Jan

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Re: this page / this spread
« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2013, 06:41:24 PM »
My first recommendation would still be the hair space solution

SAMPLE FORMAT:
fig.<paranum/><pagenum usesectionname="true" forcearabic="true" usepage="true" pagetext=", page #" usethis="true" thistext=" " useopposite="true" oppositetext="^|"/>

decostructed:

fig. - simple text for figure, unless you already have it in the numbering.

<paranum/> - if you use numebered paragraphs to number figures

usepage="true" pagetext=", page #" usethis="true" thistext=" " useopposite="true" oppositetext="^|"

^| - stands for hair space

usethis="true" thistext=" " useopposite="true" oppositetext="^|"

this takes care of the same page and the opposite page placement - that would be the entire spread, I'm pretty sure it works for foldouts and multi-page spreads the same way.

I'll check if there's an easy way my colleagues can add a setting for "absolutely nothing, not even a tiny hair space" :)

Thanks,

Jan
« Last Edit: January 04, 2013, 06:44:57 PM by Jan »

Boris

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Re: this page / this spread
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2013, 01:19:21 PM »
Thanks for the code,

There must be a difference between your and mine thin spaces, as your worked but not mine :-)

Unfortunately, in my quick test it did not work over multi-page spreads, it only cared for "this page".

But, my issue is that the cross reference needs to be separated, with several styles: (-> fig #, page #) where the bold parts normally are non-breaking, and the comma-space permits linebreaks. This sample covers some estimated 80% of the references, but sometimes it becomes more complex.

We use a minimum of one style, same spread, (not including the brackets which are not styled) up to five (identified):

(-> fig. # and Chapter title, page #)

i this case the fig are on the same spread as the crossref, but the chapter is "far" away.


I can make a list of what might cover an estimated 95% ±3, if it makes sense. I understand the more complex ones must be built modularized, with different parts.

What do you think?
/Boris

Jan

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Re: this page / this spread
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2013, 01:33:56 PM »
Can I please see the document where the hairspace isn't working? (via e-mail, please)

As for the styles, you can apply a different character style to each element of the reference

<paranum cstyle="bold"/>,

<chapnum cstyle="another style"/> or in case you need to reference a title in the running text <paratext cstyle="another style" precedingpstyle="title"/>

<pagenum cstyle="bold"/>

Thanks,

Jan

Jan

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Re: this page / this spread
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2013, 02:24:25 PM »
We've added a new special character you can use in the Cross-References formats ^0 now stands for "nothing at all", so there's no need to use the hairspace trick. Updated version will be online shortly, if you'd need it earlier, contact our support and we'll send you the plug-in pre-release version.